Creating forms

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In the casting workshop over the past week I have desperately been attempting to cast misshapen and deflated balloons that I have been keeping in the cupboard for weeks, just waiting for them to go down. It has been very difficult to do because obviously there is no solid shape to a balloon, its shape is always altering as the air inside is shifted and moulded accordingly.

I initially started making plaster molds by filling in the space around the balloon, to collect the detailed information of the wrinkles and bulges from the outside. A mold of a whole balloon had to be done in two pieces but as of the unpredictable shape, each cast had to be broken and split into many parts to get the balloon shaped cast out of it. It also didn’t help that I was casting a plaster balloon in a plaster mold, increasing the chance of sticking. After many many attempts and lots of broken plaster, I finally tried the alternative mode of creating a cast directly from filling a balloon with plaster, casting from the inside. A mode I initially dismissed because I didn’t think it would work but to my amazement it worked a treat.

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Although I don’t get the detail of the balloon’s knotted end, the exact replication of the creases and stretch marks of the deflated balloon was almost perfect.

Reflection: Despite going through so many attempts using the first way I tried and getting almost no balloon results at all. I did get some really interesting spontaneously devised results with inconsistent shapes and textures that I never could have created if I’d thought about it aesthetically before. Since moving away from these accidental pieces of art, I discovered their evident relationship to the kind of desert, rock and sand forms I have been looking at since the beginning (see below). And once I’d realised this, I started enhancing their relevance and joining pieces together and thinking about the way they looked or could look. I also like how these forms tell a story, how they were intended to be discarded as simple molds for the result I wanted but due to lack of success, they have become pieces of art and sculpture in themselves. Plus, considering the implication of the balloon, these broken molds bare the skin and surrounding negative space of the balloon, leaving its inner shape hollow and empty – a notion I’ve been trying to depict in other works prior to this.

desert rock forms

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